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What are these damn turtle bugs?

We're getting infested with these little insects they way ladybugs usually do. You know the ones. I started calling them turtle bugs a few years ago because their wings look like the shallow shell of a snapping turtle. What's funny is that I've since noticed that if they get upside down, they can't seem to right themselves even though they can fly and crawl perfectly well otherwise. They're worse than ever now in their numbers.

I don't think I need to take pictures. I bet Rikki knows.

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Yea or no way?

Wife googles to brown marmorated stink bug.

Originally from Asia. No natural predators. Imagine that.

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Marmorated stink bug is quite

Marmorated stink bug is quite likely what you are seeing. They showed up in East Tenn. in the past 3 years or so, but "no natural predators" is not true. I have witnessed a Carolina wren eat one, and spider webs are fairly non-discriminatory in their lethality. Granted, I have no idea whether the wren thought "Yum!" and went looking for more or "Blah, I'm never eating that again." Still, there are things that eat this invasive stink bug.

The problem is that once they make it into your house, they are adept at finding obscure hideaways where they overwinter in torpor, safe from most any predator, centipedes being a possible exception. Like lady beetles or box elder bugs, marmorated stinkies can accumulate in considerable numbers.

Crushing them will cause the most stink, and handling them will leave oils on your fingers that can be persistent even with soap, but their odor is not too bad unless you smash a lot of them. Unfortunately that can happen since they love narrow crevices. You could be moving furniture or boxes and have a mess on your hands before you know what happened. Vacuuming is a good approach, and prompt disposal of the bag advised. If they are on something like drapes or a box that you can transport outside without dislodging them, take it outside and shake them off.

Though I have only known them for a couple years, my sense is that they are a cosmopolitan species that will not impact local ecology as much as it impacts our lives. Like house sparrows infest cities and suburbs but not our forests, these stink bugs are something we'll need to start thinking of as fellow passengers, but they are more annoyance than threat.

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I've only seen a few around

I've only seen a few around the house (crosses fingers). We get lots of box elder beetles, tho.

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They're everywhere at my

They're everywhere at my place. A friend in England says they are blessed with them too. He calls them 'shield bugs' because of the body shape.

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Sign of fall

They are coming in the house for the winter. The good news is that they leave in the spring.

I gently scoop them onto a piece of paper and throw outside. I've never had one "stink" on me. Supposedly, they do that when they are upset.

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Problems, who has problems?

Came home tonight to find my deck littered with pink house insulation material. After a look around, I spied a 2 inch hole drilled into my siding and apparently, the "driller" pulled a good amount of insulation out of the house after making the hole. Hole is on the second story, which will require a very tall ladder to get to in order to repair.

Am gonna get on this tomorrow. But, any suggestions are welcome.

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I just caught seven in the

I just caught seven in the living room. I found a spot of weatherstripping that needs replacing on the backdoor. I hope that helps. They are ridiculous.

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We have had huge problems

We have had huge problems with them for the last couple of years. Never had any issues with ladybugs.

They don't seem to have any negative effects other than the ick factor. And they are damned stubborn - like they know you are trying to get them back outside when you catch them.

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I agree

They do seem to assert themselves, jah. I have noticed the same thing and have wondered if I have been tossing the same bug out over and over.

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I gently scoop them onto a

I gently scoop them onto a piece of paper and throw outside. I've never had one "stink" on me.

Same here on both. Except today and yesterday I've just been grabbing them and throwing them out. I'm sure they're coming right back, but this is a no-kill facility. Except for those brown creepy crawlies.

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What are they--your brown creepy crawlies, I mean?

What are your brown creepy crawlies?

I have centipedes, but not so much lately. They like to come inside in the summer. The ones that I don't want to see inside are the wolf spiders, but that rarely happens. They know they are supposed to be in the crawlspace, not the kitchen. They get tossed out on the paper plate too, but it is more exciting to toss out a tarantula sized spider than other bugs.

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Found one drowned in the

Found one drowned in the dogs' water bowl today. The whole thing had a foul odor about it. I've been using the shop vac to suck them off the high ceilings in the dining room and kitchen but they come right back in.

I've encountered many more spiders this year than I usually do too.

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I guess they're house

I guess they're house centipedes.

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Well

I found out that the centipedes eat roaches and spiders. That changed my mind for sure about them. I don't want them in the house, but am kind to them when I remove them...

Read this: (link...)

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Scoop them onto a paper plate, Tess? Help them get back outside, Jah? Factchecker?

I'm infested, too--and I wanna think I'm a "nice" person--but I've been vacuuming them up like Kenny has been and it won't bother me one whit to then douse that vacuum cleaner bag with gasoline and set it aflame!

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And I've always liked that about you. :-)

My vacuum cleaner and I are probably bound for the gaping jaws of hell...

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Oh wise Rikki, tell us what to do

Saw that too about centipedes preying on (other) pests. A symbiotic balance? Isn't it weird how we react based on appearances and yuck factor? I think it may have been one of Sam Venable's better columns where I remember it pointed out how everyone loves chipmunks 'cause they're so cute, yet they don't behave much differently than mice. That's kind of sad there's such prejudice.

We thought it was these centipedes that feed off the adhesives in cardboard, which we always have too much of. Is that roaches or something else? Also, the Wikipedia link does say centipedes can sting, though they usually don't. It gets confusing.

Dammit, I'm going to try to start leaving them alone. We have a lot of spiders and webs.

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roaches

Roaches eat paste in card board. I think that my flea treatment this summer (another story) may have killed off my centipedes. Haven't seen any lately. I first thought they might be good when I noticed their fat bellies and thought, "what in the heck are they eating"? That is when I found out they eat spiders and other bugs in the house. Mine were nice and fat. Hope they come back...

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Thanks for the insights,

Thanks for the insights, Rikki and all y'all.

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Stink Bugs

I've had them for 3 years. Now they are 3 times as worse than in the beginning. I would advise not to wait for the terminator. They only get worse. My neighbors only have a few and I now have hundreds. I have always used toilet paper to snatch them up and then down the toilet. I came home today and they were all over the house. I found out that they put the stick on one house and then over time my house became the hive through the stink. The TERMINATOR will be here tomorrow from Dodson's. If you see more than 10 on your house please don't wait or you will be sorry..Todsy I used a whole roll of toilet paper to kill maybe 300.

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They've increased exponentially at my place, just since this thread opened on Saturday.

After vacuuming up 8 or 10 here in my office this aft, I stepped from the room onto my adjacent back covered porch to find probably 300 swarming there, too (which I also vacuumed, using the vac's extension poles).

It was like something out of an Alfred Hitchcock movie. Not The Birds but The Bugs???

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Yikes!

That is a lot to deal with. Have to go beyond being kind to nature in cases like this.

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From: (link...) Scaring stink

From: (link...)

Scaring stink bugs
There were about 40 stink bugs on my outer porch wall. I had this nutty idea, that if I smashed a bunch of them with a trowel, their own stink would alert other stink bugs to a danger and scare them away. It seemed to work, as when I went out about an hour later, there were none. Science or coincidence?

A.
Michael Raupp:

You may have something here. We noticed the same thing in the field the other day while collecting them. Once they released their stinky odor, other stink bugs scattered. Keep up the good squashing!

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We're smack in the middle of 24 undeveloped acres of woods (not all of that ours), so it may be that we've begun getting more than our share for that reason?

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Or

They just like you! (Cue Mr. Rogers...)

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Scaring them, huh? Might try that tomorrow, assuming the problem presists.

But that trowel sounds like a rather heavy-handed flyswatter, don't you think? Capable of chipping the concrete on my covered porch, too!

Think I'll just round up a couple of old magazines I don't mind tossing after they've been soiled.

Cheaper than a "terminator," anyway...

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I think I may have some of

I think I may have some of your bugs here, Tam. I spent two thirty-minute sessions yesterday and two more today with the shop vac. Each time I thought I was done and shut the machine down, I looked around and there was a dozen or so more. Of course I'm somewhat handicapped what with my 'help' from Faith who loves to play with the hose.

I've also been flailing with a fly swatter.

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My son says our local Fox affiliate did a story on local stinkbug infestation just moments ago.

(I don't watch TV, so I can't tell you what channel that was.)

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ongoing expense

Their scent signals distress, so it would make sense if their fellows took it as a hint to fly off. Insects are highly sensitive to pheromones, so squishing one or two is as effective as squishing dozens.

Don't make these things a bigger mess or cost than they need to be. The scent gets released when you suck them up with a vacuum just as well as if you squash one. Chase them around a bit, rough them up, but don't make yourself wipe up bug guts. They are slow, clumsy and less stinky than lots of native species.

If you discover they have turned your curtains into an encampment, detach curtain from rod, walk it outside and shake it off. They'll release plenty of pheromones. Shake them out when it is going to frost and many will die.

Pay what you will, but they are here to stay. Invasive species don't go extinct. They are the opposite of extinct. Termination is a yearly cost.

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karma

i kill reluctantly, but...

notice that if you disturb a bug on the wall, it will usually just let go and drop before trying to fly. So take a small (eg 8 or 16 oz or so) flat-sided container, fill it half full of water with one drop of dishwash liquid, hold it against the wall just below the bug, and let the bug drop into that. A lid is useful to flick the bug and then cover the container

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To my knowledge, these stink bugs don't drill?

I'll have minor problems with carpenter bees every few years. In the last such incident, they went after some wood furnishings on my front covered porch, leaving a clean, perfectly circular "tunnel" about a half an inch in diameter in a tabletop.

Could this be your varmint?

If so, here is some online advice for ridding yourself of them.

(Looks like this company also carries a Strube Sticky Stink Bug Trap, for use indoors, for $54.95. Since it's out of stock right now anyway, guess I don't need to ponder just yet whether I'd like this atrocity suspended from the ceiling in my office...)

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my enemy is a bird

Tamara, I wasn't clear, but I am sure that the critter that drilled the almost perfect hole in my cedar siding is an evil downy woodpecker. He has caused a lot of damage to my neighbor's homes over the past few years but up until yesterday had never gotten around to mine. I called my contractor friend today and he is bringing over a ladder and some sealant to plug up the hole. I said to him that he won't believe the amount of pink insulation all over my deck. But, he said he has seen it all before...

My advice to anyone who is looking for a house is to buy a brick one.

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I wouldn't have guessed, but

I wouldn't have guessed, but then you didn't mention cedar. I had a cedar house that had the same problem. It was usually knot holes they'd go after, though. Once the holes were plugged with silicone or whatever, the problem generally diminished.

Funny how woodpeckers are a favorite when they stay in there place in the woods. Good luck with that. I was glad to not get a cedar house again, I must say.

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(Off-topic)

Well, now I have to ask: We have throngs of woodpeckers in the surrounding woods, but they've never gone after our brick-and-vinyl house. Is it susceptible (the vinyl siding part, I mean)???

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I tried the dish washing

I tried the dish washing liquid / water combo today in a small glass container on bugs within easy reach. A very long hose on the shop vac is still necessary for the high ceilings.

It was surprising how many of these things will actually dive into the liquid, especially if they are clinging to something in a head-down position. A pencil nudging them from behind helps.

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I've never heard of any birds

I've never heard of any birds going after vinyl, that I can recall. I believe woodpeckers are going after a food source within the wood. Who knows why they stay and toss spun fiberglas everywhere once they've broken through. Maybe they're disappointed in their meal.

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What are these damn turtle bugs?

Tortoise beetle which I've found on my potatoes in the past! I don't use chemicals/pestisides just seed blankets

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LADY BUGS

THE STORY ABOUT LADY BUGS GOES BACK FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY.
FARMERS WERE PLAGUED WITH APHIDS ON THIER CROPS.
THEY ALL WENT TO CHURCH TO PRAY TO THE BLESSED MOTHER MARY TO SAVE THEIR CROPS SO THEY WOULD NOT STARVE FOR THE WINTER.
WHEN THEY ARRIVED HOME, THERE WAS AN INFESTATION OF LADY BUGS, AS THEY ATE UP ALL OF THE APHIDS. THE CROPS WERE SAVED.
THE FARMERS CALLED THEM THE BUGS OF THE LADY, OR LADY BUGS.
LADYBUGS EAT THE APHIDS OFF OF PLANTS. THEY ARE OUR FRIENDS.
WHEN i SEE A FEW LADYBUGS IN THE HOUSE, I CAPTURE THEM AND PUT THEM ON MY PLANTS. IF I HAVE A SWARM OF THEM, I VACUUM THEM UP AND EMPTY THE BAG OUTSIDE. I LOVE LADYBUGS, AS I PLAYED WITH THEM AS A CHILD.

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